Giving Teens Tools To Become Emotionally Healthy Leaders

by | Oct 4, 2019 | 0 comments

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How can we raise them to be Emotionally Healthy Leaders?

Teens are going through an era in culture and society that has never been done before. We have smartphones and social media in our pockets, we have so many choices of food, events, music and fashion to name a few.

These things all impact the teens as they are growing up and finally being asked to be who they want to be. It's a daunting time for them because they don’t know what they actually want.

Emotionally Healthy Leaders - Strong Personalities

They’re so young and don’t really know what being an adult is going to be like for them. Much less understand how to understand their emotions and use them towards becoming healthy and successful leaders.

They’re also trying to fit in with crowds where they want to belong, they’re constantly searching for new friends that are into the same things they are. It's only natural to want to be with people you find more relatable and interesting. But that also means you have to put yourself out on a whim and hope you don’t get rejected. Parents can do more to help their teenagers feel more comfortable in their own skin, which will also help them become emotionally healthy leaders in the long run.

Giving Teens Tools To Become Emotionally Healthy Leaders

Discovering Positive Friendships 

How else do teenagers get to know one another really, other than spending time with each other outside of school? They must be allowed to have sleepovers and have their friends over for dinner once in a while. The same goes for them, you should allow your teenagers to have dinner at their friend’s house if they want to every now and then.

Discovering new people at school and hanging out with them outside of normal class hours is how true friendships form. So as parents, don’t be strict on these small issues. For sleepovers, try to be as accommodating as you can. Give them the tools they need such as sleeping bags, torches, electric heaters and snacks with drinks. Just leave them to it and give them space; don’t be intrusive.

A Safe Place To Discuss Their Worries

Giving teenagers the opportunity to talk about their worries is very helpful for their mental health. They are still developing and their brain is undergoing some large changes as they go from teenager to adult. If you do have teenaged children that are showing signs of mental health concerns, then you can always take them to a teenage anxiety treatment center.

Here the professionals will help your child to understand their feelings and why they are worrying about certain things. If they have social anxiety then they should be allowed to practice meeting new people in a controlled environment. Other teenagers will also be at this kind of treatment center so they can find something to relate to and understand more about their condition. 

Positive Encouragements

This is one that I struggle with on a daily basis. I grew up being critiqued on every single little thing I did, and it really messed with my mental stability.

Parents must realize that they grew up in different eras and your children are going to be different to you. So don’t be overly critical of how they dress, what music they listen to and what kind of things they enjoy from their generation.

Emotionally Healthy Leaders - Forming Bonds

Think about how you were raised, there were things you had to learn on your own because your parents didn't or couldn't help out. Backing off a little and being less critical of your teens can strengthen their future to become of a company's future emotionally healthy leaders.

Parents can do a lot to help their children feel more comfortable in their own skin. One of them is to allow them to spend more time with friends after normal school hours.

Emotionally Healthy Leaders - PN

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I’m extremely upfront with my Mental Health, I want my readers to know, there is always someone who will listen. If you ever need someone to talk to, please reach out to me on my Facebook page or call one of the numbers below.

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